Simple Examples of Nationality

Nationality is about more than just the country where you live. Use these simple examples of nationality to understand how this concept is about social belonging more than physical location.

Nationality is about more than just the country where you live. Use these simple examples of nationality to understand how this concept is about social belonging more than physical location.

Nationality Is Different Than Citizenship

Nationality can mean different things, depending on the context. For instance, in immigration and legal documents, it can sometimes mean citizenship. However, nationality is not the same as citizenship. Citizenship has to do with where you live as a legal resident of a country, but nationality has to do with where you belong. You can live in one place and belong in another, as these examples show.

Yearning for Home

Svetlana lives in the United States, but she was born in Russia. Her parents still live in Russia, and she still speaks Russian. Although she is a legal citizen, she has only lived in the US for a few years. She yearns to return to Russia and plans to go back.

Even though Svetlana is a US citizen, she doesn't consider herself to be an American. She feels she belongs in Russia, which means her nationality is Russian.

A New Immigrant

Muhammad was born in India but has always dreamt of living in Canada. He worked hard in school and has come to Canada as a university student. He loves Canada and plans to apply for citizenship to become a permanent resident.

While Muhammad is Indian, he is also Canadian. Although Muhammad is not yet a legal citizen of Canada, he feels he belongs in that country. His future plans indicate that his nationality is Canadian too.

The Relationship Between Ethnicity and Nationality

Like nationality, ethnicity involves the concept of belonging. However, ethnicity is not about the country where someone lives or was born. Instead, it involves common cultural factors like music, religion, food, dress, and others. These simple examples can help.

Ancestral Origins

Jacque has spent his whole life in Montreal and speaks French. His neighbors and coworkers all speak French too. His ancestors emigrated to Canada from France generations ago, and he's proud of his heritage. Even though Jacque's nationality is simply Canadian, his ethnicity is French-Canadian.

Shared History

Nichelle is an African American fourth grader at an elementary school in Chicago. She's at the top of her class and enjoys history. She is also fascinated with the history of her own family and talks to her grandmother about her experiences during the Civil Rights era and the family's history of slavery. Nichelle is American because she lives in and feels part of the United States, and her ethnicity is also African American.

Nations and Countries

A nation and a country can be the same, but they don't always have to be. A nation is the physical territory and the people who live in it. A country is the physical territory, the people who live in it, and the government that controls it.

People can also live in more than one nation but a single country, as in the Great Sioux Nation. People of Native American ethnicity may live on reservation land that is a nation in itself, while also living in the nation and country of the United States.

Is "American" a Nationality?

People who identify as belonging in the country of the United States are considered to have American nationality; however, this can be a little confusing. "American" is a term of casual usage. The US Department of State refers to citizens as "US Nationals." This eliminates confusion with the American continents.

Types of Nationality in the United Kingdom

Some governments define several different types of nationality in a legal sense. For instance, there are six types of British nationality in the United Kingdom:

  • British citizen: Someone born in the UK or who has received official citizenship

  • British overseas territory citizen: Someone who was born in an overseas territory of Great Britain or has obtained citizenship there

  • British overseas citizen: Often someone who would otherwise be considered stateless but who was born in a British territory or has a parent born in a British territory

  • British subject: An uncommon designation that applies to people who were British subjects prior to 1948 but did not become a British citizen or a citizen of another country

  • British national (overseas): Someone who was connected with Hong Kong prior to 1997 and did not become a British overseas territories citizen

  • British protected person: Someone born stateless in the UK or a territory and has a parent who was a British protected person

Countries and Nationalities of the World

This printable chart lists many of the world's nationalities and their associated countries.

Country

Nationality

Afghanistan

Afghan

Albania

Albanian

Algeria

Algerian

Andorra

Andorran

Angola

Angolan

Argentina

Argentinian

Armenia

Armenian

Australia

Australian

Austria

Austrian

Azerbaijan

Azerbaijani

Bahamas

Bahamaian

Bangladesh

Bangladeshi

Barbados

Barbadian

Belarus

Belarussian

Belgium

Belgian

Benin

Beninese

Bhutan

Bhutanese

Bolivia

Bolivian

Bosnia

Bosnian

Brazil

Brazilian

Brunei

Bruneian

Bulgaria

Bulgarian

Burma

Burmese

Burundi

Burundian

Cambodia

Cambodian

Cameroon

Cameroonian

Canada

Canadian

Chad

Chadian

Chile

Chilean

China

Chinese

Columbia

Columbian

Congo

Congolese

Croatia

Croatian

Cuba

Cuban

Cyprus

Cypriot

Czech Republic

Czech

Denmark

Danish

Dominica

Dominican

Ecuador

Ecuadorian

Egypt

Egyptian

El Salvador

Salvadorean

England

English

Eritrea

Eritrean

Estonia

Estonian

Ethiopia

Ethiopian

Fiji

Fijian

Finland

Finnish

France

French

Gabon

Gabonese

Gambia

Gambian

Georgia

Georgian

Germany

German

Ghana

Ghanaian

Greece

Greek

Granada

Granadian

Guatemala

Guatemalan

Guinea

Guinean

Guyana

Guyanese

Haiti

Haitian

Honduras

Honduran

Hungary

Hungarian

Iceland

Icelandic

India

Indian

Indonesia

Indonesian

Iran

Iranian

Iraq

Iraqi

Ireland

Irish

Israel

Israeli

Italy

Italian

Jamaica

Jamaican

Japan

Japanese

Jordan

Jordanian

Kazakhstan

Kazakh

Kenya

Kenyan

Korea

Korean

Kuwait

Kuwaiti

Laos

Laotian

Latvia

Latvian

Lebanon

Lebonese

Liberia

Liberian

Libya

Libyan

Liechtenstein

Liechtensteiner

Lithuania

Lithuanian

Luxembourg

Luxembourger

Macedonia

Macedonian

Madagascar

Madagascan

Malawi

Malawian

Malaysia

Malaysian

Maldives

Maldivian

Mali

Malian

Malta

Maltese

Mauritania

Mauritanian

Mauritius

Mauritian

Mexico

Mexican

Moldova

Moldovan

Monaco

Monocan

Mongolia

Mongolian

Montenegro

Montenegrin

Morocco

Moroccan

Mozambique

Mozambican

Namibia

Namibian

Nepal

Nepalese

Netherlands

Dutch

Nicaragua

Nicaraguan

Niger

Nigerien

Nigeria

Nigerian

Norway

Norwegian

Pakistan

Pakistani

Panama

Panamanian

Paraguay

Paraguayan

Peru

Peruvian

Philippines

Filipino

Poland

Polish

Portugal

Portuguese

Qatar

Qatari

Romania

Romanian

Russia

Russian

Rwanda

Rwandan

Saudi Arabia

Saudi

Scotland

Scottish

Senegal

Senegalese

Serbia

Serbian

Singapore

Singaporean

Slovakia

Slovakian

Slovenia

Slovenian

Somalia

Somalian

Spain

Spanish

Sri Lanka

Sri Lankan

Sudan

Sudanese

Suriname

Surinamese

Swaziland

Swazi

Sweden

Swedish

Switzerland

Swiss

Syria

Syrian

Taiwan

Taiwanese

Tajikistan

Tadzhik

Tanzania

Tanzanian

Thailand

Thai

Togo

Togolese

Trinidad

Trinidanian

Tunisia

Tunisian

Turkey

Turkish

Uganda

Ugandan

Ukraine

Ukrainian

United Kingdom

British

United States

American

Uruguay

Uruguayan

Uzbekistan

Uzbek

Venezuela

Venezuelan

Vietnam

Vietnamese

Wales

Welsh

Yemen

Yemeni

Yugoslavia

Yugoslavian

Zambia

Zambian

Zimbabwe

Zimbabwean


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